Archive for August 2014

The Community Roundup: August 27, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week!

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* Luke Hankins’s poem “Adam” was selected as a finalist in Ruminate’s Janet B. McCabe Poetry Prize.

* Rochelle Hurt’s The Rusted City was featured in post at The Journal:

Rochelle Hurt’s “novel in poems” The Rusted City also hit close to home, with an exquisite portrait of a dysfunctional family living in a city where rust coats every surface, floats in every breath, and rains down like dandruff when women brush their hair. An example of what Hurt calls the Rust Belt Gothic—a genre in which she also includes Journal-contributor Jamaal May’s work—The Rusted City will resonate with readers far beyond the region it depicts.

Rochelle’s poem “Hallucination with Bees” was also featured by Green Mountains Review!

* Wesley Rothman’s poem “Throbbing in the Bush / Pledge” is in the latest issue of New England Review.

* Our Durham neighbor Sam Stephenson’s “Bull City Summer” project was featured on The New Yorker‘s website.

* Sean Hill’s “Postcard to My Third Crush Today” was posted on Verse Daily!

Issue Sixty-One of The Collagist is out!

* Kevin Simmond’s poem “Nod” is in Summer 2014 issue of Prairie Schooner!

* TJ Jarrett’s “1973: My Mother Cleaves Herself in Two” (originally published in VQR) was featured at Poetry Daily.

* Some of Matt Bell’s poems were posted at Everyday Genius.

* Spring 2014 Black River Chapbook Competition finalists & semi-finalists announced! Congrats to Kai Carlson-Wee and others!

Issue 14: All Visual of The Economy is live!

* Check out Jason McCall’s “Roll Call for Michael Brown” at Rattle.

* BCP’s Rebecca Hazelton’s poem “We’ll Fix It In Post” featured at The Missouri Review.

* The latest issue of The Oxford American includes poems by Dorianne Laux and Fady Joudah!

* Jan LaPerle’s new collection, A Pretty Place to Mourn, is now available from BlazeVOX.

* Justin L. Daugherty and Brent Rydin have started a new press, Jellyfish Highway. “We are a press for work that floats and undulates and lingers and stings, literature that shines from the deepest blue.”

* Ada Limón’s poem “Oranges & The Ocean” was featured on The NYT Magazine blog.

* Anders Carlson-Wee’s poem “Polaroid” is in The Paris-American.

* Jeff Hardin’s poem “A Myth that Changes with Every Retelling” featured at Chapter 16.

* Elizabeth T. Gray, Jr.’s poem “In The Guest House For Pilgrims” (Series: India (Four Way Books, 2015)) is in the latest issue of The Cortland Review.

* Hannah Dela Cruz Abrams’s “A Guide to Surviving Your Father’s Homelessness” was unlocked at The Oxford American.

* BCP’s Brittany Cavallaro mentioned in Publishers Weekly‘s “The M.F.A. Workshop: From Red Ink to Published Book“:

Brittany Cavallaro attended the University of Wisconsin for her M.F.A. in poetry; it’s an intimate program that accepts only a handful of students in each genre and opens for applications in poetry only every other year (during off-years, it accepts applications in fiction). Cavallaro’s poetry cohort at UW-Madison consisted of six other writers. “We had all of our workshops together,” she says. “In short, they saw every single thing I wrote for two years. My cohort didn’t just see my poems as individual pieces (though that was a consideration); they were also always able to speak to how my project––and later, my manuscript––was evolving. If it seemed like I was just rewriting an earlier poem, they’d tell me. If a poem felt like it could be in that collection, they’d tell me that, too.”

Cavallaro’s first full-length poetry collection, Girl-King, will be released by University of Akron press in February 2015. When she began the program, she was coming off a nine-month writing dry spell. Her first workshop kickstarted her writing, and she produced nearly 40 poems that initial semester. “Not all of those poems made their way into the manuscript, but they formed its spine,” she recalls. “Nearly every poem in the manuscript was workshopped, and the ones that weren’t were looked at by my friend Jacques J. Rancourt, who had been in all my workshops and who is my first and best reader.”

Save the Alaska Quarterly Review!

Our initial elation at Monday’s news that the months-long prioritization process at UAA has determined that the university should invest more resources in arts, languages, and humanities was quickly overshadowed by their conclusion that the Alaska Quarterly Review is one of the non-academic programs needing “further review, consideration for reduction or phase out.” Say it ain’t so!

* Congrats to Tracy K. Smith for receiving the Academy of American Poets Fellowship!

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Win Bassett‘s nonfiction has been published online in The Atlantic, the Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and  Guernica. His fiction and poetry have been published or are forthcoming in The Southern Poetry AnthologyImage, PANK, and  Pea River Journal. He’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee and as Legal Advisor for AsymptoteFollow him on Twitter @winbassett.

The Community Roundup: August 13, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week!

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* BCP’s beloved former managing editor, Marielle Prince, is now a VIDA intern!

Two Dollar Radio has a new website!

PANK issue 9.8/August 2014 is out.

* Tyler Mills was interviewed about her first book of poems, Tongue Lyre:

Q: What about the publication of the actual poems in journals and magazines prior to the book being published? Was there ever a concern for you to have the majority of the poems published before you were sending out your manuscript?

A: Poets should stop worrying about this. It seems like there’s a mentality that once all the poems are taken, the book is “done.” Even if every single poem in a manuscript is published, that does not mean that a poet’s book is finished—no matter where all these poems have been taken. Think of a book like a giant poem. Ask yourself, “What does my giant poem want to be? How is it holding together, as a giant poem?”

INCH contributor Phillip B. Williams will have his next book, Witnesspublished by Alice James Books.

INCH contributor Roxane Gay is receiving lots of praise for her new book, Bad Feminist. See The GuardianNPR, and The New York Times.

Thrush Poetry Journal announces its Best of the Net 2014 Nominations!

* Nominate your favorite journal or press for the AWP Small Press Publisher Award.

* This interview with Wesley Rothman is fantastic:

I can’t think of any writers or poets I wish were taught differently, per se, mostly because I can’t say they’re taught in universally similar ways, but I wish writing and reading were taught differently, and I wish poets other than Whitman, Dickinson, Eliot, WCW, and Frost were taught in high schools. It’s important to become familiar with the canon, but teach high school students poetry that speaks about their world, not the world of their great-[great-]grandparents. Teach them Natalie Diaz, Marcus Wicker, Amiri Baraka, Wallace Stevens, Roger Reeves, Matthew Zapruder, Natasha Trethewey. Something that I can’t put my finger on at the moment is making history and historical context difficult to process for younger generations. We have to find a way to help young people find poignance in what happened 200 years ago before we can help them find poignance in Coleridge, Wheatley, Blake, Austen, and Wordsworth.

* The new issue of the Southern Humanities Review is out!

* Tarfia Faizullah’s Seam reviewed at Slate by our Durham neighbor Jonathan Farmer:

The beauty of these poems does not redeem tragedy; at times, in fact, it seems to sully it. But that sullying—the humid tangle of lives, Faizullah’s own losses pressing in alongside the stories of the Birangona, her sexual desires flaring up back at her hotel room, her feelings of shame, her disquiet in the streets of Dhaka, the company of Western authors (Tomas Tranströmer, Paul Celan, Willa Cather) amid everyone else’s words—offers an unusually persuasive image of the ways old tragedies persist.

* Sandra Beasley reads her poem “Ukulele” for NPR.

* “Hey, have you noticed the names of African American poets on several covers of Poetry magazine lately?”

Ninth Letter announces the winners of its second annual Literary Awards competition. Congrats to Anders Carlson-Wee!

* Wendy Xu’s poem “Dedication” appears in Hyperallergic.

* I was thrilled to see Carolina Ebeid’s “You Ask Me to Talk About the Interior” featured at Poetry Daily.

* Ross White’s (editor of BCP) poetry collection, How We Came Upon the Colony, is available for pre-order from Unicorn Press! Isn’t the cover gorgeous?

* Wiley Cash has a new story in Salt Magazine.

* Danniel Schoonebeek’s second book of poems, C’est la guerre, will be published by Poor Claudia in 2015. He also a poem in the latest issue of Indiana Review.

* I hope “poetry videos” become a thing. This one by  and his brother Anders is wonderful:
A few weeks ago, we received an email from our friend, poet Kai Carlson-Wee. He told us that he had spent the summer traveling, and along with working on new poems, he had created a “poetry video.” He wanted to know if we would be interested in showcasing his poetry video since the audio is “Holes in the Mountain,” one of his five poems from his 2014 Editors’ Prize winning entry. We weren’t really sure what a poetry video would look like, but we said, yeah sure we’d love to sit down and check out his work. So he sent us the link. And we watched it. Then watched it again. And again. And again.

* GRIND co-founder Matthew Olzmann has two new poems, “The Minotaurs” and “Nate Brown is Looking For a Moose”, in the new issue of Poetry Northwest.

* Rebecca Gayle Howell and Husam Qaisi’s translation of Amal al-Jubouri’s Hagar Before the Occupation, Hagar After the Occupation is Alice James Books’s book of the week!

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Win Bassett‘s nonfiction has been published online in The Atlantic, the Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and  Guernica. His fiction and poetry have been published or are forthcoming in The Southern Poetry AnthologyImage, PANK, and  Pea River Journal. He’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee and as Legal Advisor for AsymptoteFollow him on Twitter @winbassett.