Archive for June 2014

The Community Roundup: June 25, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week!

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* The Summer 2014 issue of VQR is out. Wonderful work, Ralph Eubanks, Allison Wright, and the rest of the VQR folks! We especially love  every TJ Jarrett poem included.

* Coffee House Press‘s Caroline Casey interviewed at Publishers Weekly:

Coffee House came across A Girl Is a Half-formed Thing via the magic of Twitter. Elizabeth McCracken, who is one of that medium’s funniest and most good-spirited contributors, had tweeted about the book lacking a U.S. publisher. Chris Fischbach, our publisher, responded to her…because you listen to Elizabeth. He and I both read it and knew we had to sign it immediately. The catch was that Chris was on vacation in northern Minnesota and out of cell-phone range, so the contract was negotiated during daily furtive trips to town to steal Wi-Fi in the grocery store parking lot.

* BCP’s Rebecca Hazelton on Brian Brodeur’s How a Poem Happens!

When I write something I’m proud of, I’m very full of myself immediately afterwards, and I have on occasion let that feeling get the better of me, and sent out work that wasn’t fully formed. But editors are smart—they reject that work. As I’ve gotten older, I do that sort of impulsive submissions less—both because I have a little less energy to throw at submitting, but also because I’ve come to recognize the value of polish and thought. Poems might sit several months, get a revision, and then get sent out, or, poems might sit for a year. Some poems don’t go out, of course, because I never feel they are up to snuff.

* Rochelle Hurt and two of her poems are featured at Connotation Press!

* Y’all, check out the new issue of Midnight Breakfast. We’re so excited for Rebecca Rubenstein and her team’s new publication:

Now when I say surreal, I mean this: imagine you’ve helped create a small literary project, and the best you hope for is that someone — anyone — finds their way to it. Now imagine how it feels when, the day you go live, that someone turns into 1,000+ readers, and suddenly your eyes are scanning what seems like an endless stream of retweets and Facebook shares and other social media boosts, all positively publicizing your first issue. A tiny corner of the internet is alive with buzz, and as you watch the numbers jump, not just in U.S. locations but all over the world, you can’t help but exclaim “holy shit” over and over, because, in all seriousness, this is not what you expected. Sure, maybe word would get around, through some kind of grapevine, that a new publication was in town, but this kind of debut? I was floored.

Fast-forward two months later, and the next wave of surreality hits: through the generous support of over 150 funders, plus donations of personal time, books, and other prizes from countless individuals, this humble little literary magazine became fully-funded for a year. On April 14th, we received just over $12,000 in donations, some of which came from people we knew, and some of which came from people completely unfamiliar to us. To say we were bowled over is an understatement. When we launched the magazine, one of our main goals was to be able to pay all of our contributors for their work. With this funding, we’re now able to do that for a full year, and in an age where money always seems tight, this outpouring of generosity has left us speechless and moved.

* The latest issue of The Kenyon Review has work from Mary Ruefle, George Saunders, Carl Phillips, and more.

* The new issue of The American Poetry Review is out!

* Rebecca Gayle Howell‘s poem “Elegy at Terminal L” appear at The Prague Review.

* GRIND’r Kelly Fordon‘s short story collection, Garden for the Blind, will be published by  Wayne State University Press in May 2015.

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Win Bassett‘s essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and  Guernica. His stories and poems have been published or are forthcoming in  PANK, Image, Ruminate, and  The Southern Poetry Anthology seriesHe’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee. Follow him on Twitter @winbassett.

The Community Roundup: June 18, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week!

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* Aaron Belz takes over as Hillsborough, N.C., poet laureate:

And Belz looks at his role through the lens of some advice he received unintentionally at a car shop in Durham. An older man walked up to him in the parking lot, put a hand on Belz’s shoulder, and told him, “If you ain’t nothing here, you ain’t nothing nowhere.”

“Right out of the blue,” Belz said. “I don’t know why he said it to me. … I was like, man, that’s wisdom. So I feel like they have that cliché, if you can make it in New York, you can make it anywhere. I think you can say it the opposite way. If you can’t make it in Hillsborough, you can’t make it anywhere.

* BCP’s Rebecca Hazelton has new work in the latest issue of 32 Poems.

* Congrats to friends Phil Klay and Laura van den Berg for making the Frank O’Connor prize shortlist!

* Carolina Ebeid’s “All Those Gorgeous Feelings” in The Paris-American is, well, gorgeous.

* The latest issue of Waxwing is stunning. Check out new work from contributors Emilia Phillips and Jenny Johnson and from friends C. Dale Young, Rose McLarney, and Tarfia Faizullah.

* Issue Fifty-Nine of The Collagist is out!

* Read, listen, and live into Rebecca Gayle Howell’s 2014 Pushcart Prize winning poem, “My Mother Told Us Not to Have Children,” at Rattle.

* Christopher Martin won Mountain Heritage Literary Festival‘s 2014 George Scarbrough Prize for Poetry and came in second for the Emma Bell Miles Prize for Essay!

* Helen Vitoria’s collection Corn Exchange has been nominated for the 2015 Tufts Discovery Award!

* Luke Hankins has a sonnet in the latest issue of Bluestem.

* GRIND’r Robin Martin was shortlisted for the Dundee International Book Prize for Out Like a Lion!

* Check out a poem from INCH contributor Rochelle Hurt on Verse Daily: “In the Century of Mandatory Crying.”

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Win Bassett‘s essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and  Guernica. His stories and poems have been published or are forthcoming in  PANK, Image, Ruminate, and  The Southern Poetry Anthology seriesHe’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee. Follow him on Twitter @winbassett.

The Community Roundup: June 11, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week!

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Iowa Review has redesigned its website!

Wigleaf has named Leesa Cross-Smith’s “Ladies Love Outlaws” and Nick Ripatrazone’s “The Cribbing Collar,” to its Top 50 (Very) Short Fictions list.

* Matthew Olzmann has two poems in the new issue of Fogged Clarity.

* John Ebersole has new poems in BOAAT Vo.l 1.

* Did you know that Khadijiah Queen’s e-book I’m So Fine: A List of Famous Men and What I Had On was written entirely during a GRIND last summer?

* Aaron Belz’s new collection, Glitter Bomb (Persea), is out!

* We are thrilled that Rebecca Gayle Howell is the now Poetry Editor of The Oxford American! Check out OA‘s interview with her:

I come to poetry with the hope of writing toward what I don’t yet know, don’t understand, but want to. It’s much like that old Christian adage, “I pray because it changes me, not because it changes God.” So, while I now see that Render possesses a larger architecture, it was not by design, or at least not at first. An early teacher of mine, James Baker Hall, advised me to “listen and dictate.” If I have a method I return to, it’s that one. I catch a line being uttered somewhere in the inscape, and I write it down. Then I repeat it to myself until I hear something new; I follow its lead. In the case of Render, my process led to an agrarian myth, an almanac for climate change, but I didn’t set out to write such an almanac. I set out to write an honest line.

* GRIND’r Elizabeth T. Gray, Jr., and Elisabeth Lewis Corley’s project has been accepted by UNC’s Process Series:

Using texts from a poem cycle by contemporary poet Elizabeth T. Gray, Jr., World War I period texts ranging from poetry to trench songs to military instruction manuals and field maps; Geomancy: Divination by Geography, a performance piece for poetry, dance, and multimedia, explores how those actions morph into ritual, how our sense of safety depends on our deepest connections.

​* Asheville Poetry Review‘s Luke Hankins, BCP’s Ross White and Win Bassett, and friend Rose McLarney all will have new work in The Southern Poetry Anthology, Vol. VII: North Carolina (Texas Review Press, eds. William Wright, Jesse Graves, and Paul Ruffin).

* Congrats to ​Luke Johnson who has new work forthcoming in the summer issue of The Southern Review!

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Win Bassett‘s essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and  Guernica. His stories and poems have been published or are forthcoming in  PANK, Image, Ruminate, and  The Southern Poetry Anthology seriesHe’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee. Follow him on Twitter @winbassett.