Archive for May 2014

The Community Roundup: May 28, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week!

—-

* Read Ada Limón’s Pushcart-winning poem, “How to Triumph Like a Girl” in Gulf Coast. Ada also has a poem in this week’s New Yorker!

* There’s a fantastic essay up at VQR about innovation in the independent publishing world: “What does innovation look like in the context of literary publishing? Hint: It’s not e-books.”

* Summer issue of The Oxford American is out, and Rebecca Gayle Howell is the guest poetry editor!

* Our friend Luke Hankins, Senior Editor of Asheville Poetry Reviewwrites about Bruce Beasley’s Theophobia in 32Poems:

God as invading organism. God as death sentence. And yet this is a prayer to be invaded, to be sentenced to death. Is this masochism? Suicidal desire? Or is it an accusation against God’s goodness?

In the excerpt above from “Having Read the Holy Spirit’s Wikipedia,” I suggest that it is Beasley’s awe that wins out over his horror. It is a prayer—a fearful one, yes (“Spirit / of Holy Fear, who’s afraid?”)—of surrender of the self to a system that supersedes the self, in which annihilation of the self may contribute to the terrible beauty of the whole.”

* It would be a good and joyful thing, always and everywhere, if more poets created reader’s guides to their collections in an effort to help teachers get poetry in classrooms. See David Tomas Martinez’s example! In other Martinez news, “The Only Mexican” was featured by Poetry Daily this month, and “Forgetting Willie James Jones” was on Split This Rock.

* Matthew Olzmann, co-editor of the GRIND anthologyinterviewed at Best American Poetry:

I like how Ocean Vuong answered this same question a couple days ago, saying, “Some days I feel like a human. Some days I feel more like a sound.”  I like the flexibility of that answer, allowing for an identity in flux.  For me too, it changes rapidly, from moment to moment.  Right now, there’s a baseball game on the radio.  I’m all about—this October—the Detroit Tigers winning the 2014 World Series. If this fails to happen, I’ll be all about them winning it in 2015.  I’m easily distracted, and what I’m “all about” is constantly in motion.  I’m all about the newborn lambs and piglets on the farm of the college where I teach. I’m all about the mountains that surround this place. In the autumn, when the leaves begin to fall, you can see houses behind the tree line that you didn’t know were there.

* Lincoln Michel won a Pushcart for his @NOONAnnual story! (Will also be in my collection, Upright Beasts, coming next year from @Coffee_House_)

* Sara Henning’s collection of flash, Garden Effigies, will be published by Blue Lyra Press, a chapbook imprint of Blue Lyra Review!

* Arisa White has a new project that stems from work she’s done on a libretto in previous GRINDS:

Post Pardon: The Opera is a collaborative musical production by Oakland-based playwright and poet Arisa White with tenor saxophonist and composer Jessica Jones, who lives in New York City. The libretto is an adaptation of the poetry collection, Post Pardon, written by Arisa, which, through the use of Caribbean and Greek mythologies, explores the interior landscape of an African American woman who contemplates life: the taking of her own and that of her only child.

She is using Kickstarter to raise money to cover theater rental costs (including lighting, sound, security, insurance), artist fees, and videotaping associated with her first concert of songs at The Marion E. Greene Theater in Oakland on July 13, 2014.

* One of Mark Jay Brewin, Jr.’s poems was Missouri Review‘s Poem of the Week.

WaPo reports that Electric Literature is relaunching, and Lincoln Michel is the new online editor.

* Hope Mills’s short story in Guernica made NPR‘s Book News!

—-

Win Bassett‘s essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and  Guernica. His stories and poems have been published or are forthcoming in  PANK, Image, Ruminate, and  TropHe’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee. Follow him on Twitter @winbassett.

The Community Roundup: May 21, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week!

—-

* Hope Mills has a new short story in the latest issue of Guernica–What Lights Up the Night“:

You have never heard of Belfast, Northern Ireland, or the IRA. Never shared a room with anyone other than your little sister, Erica, who will sleep in your parents’ walk-in closet while an eleven-year-old Irish exchange student named Paula takes her bed.

This is how your parents have explained Paula’s coming: In Northern Ireland, the Protestants and Catholics are fighting. You are one of several families who will host children from both sides with the hope that one day, as grownups, they will remember that they are not so different from each other.

* Mark Jay Brewin, Jr., is the Walter E. Dakin Fellow at the Sewanee Writers’ Conference this summer, and Anna Claire Hodge won the Tennessee Williams Scholarship in Poetry!

* New issue of The Collagist is out!

* New issue of The Southern Review is out with work from our friend Joshua Poteat!

* Christopher Martin has two poems, “Gulf Fritillaries, Allatoona Creek” and “Conversion at Owl Creek,” in the current issue of Sugar Mule, guest-edited by Alyse Knorr.

* Wendy Xu interviewed by Front Porch Journal:

It is very often anxiety and urgency that move me to write poems. And it seems to me that everybody who is not a Wall Street banker or a venture capitalist is engaged in the radical act of being a better person. I mean, it seems so easy to become awful. When I say that poetry is a radical act, I mean that there is no late-capitalism approved economic theorem that even remotely suggests poetry is a good or meaningful idea; it does not mean to be approved by late-capitalism. It is “illogical” in the best way. It does not make money. It is not FOR money. It is a radical act because it is filled with hope and widely ill advised.

* Grind’r Elizabeth T. Gray, Jr.’s poem “Devi: The Goddess” is in the new issue of the New England Review!

* BCP’s Ross White won the Yemassee 2014 Pocataligo Poetry Contest!

* BCP’s INCH No. 25 is now available! Catch up on back issues here!

Summer 2014 Oxford American hits stands soon. Friends Hannah Dela Cruz Abrams, Ansel Elkins, and Tarfia Faizullah have work in it!

—-

Win Bassett‘s essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and  Guernica. His stories and poems have been published or are forthcoming in  PANK, Image, Ruminate, and  TropHe’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee. Follow him on Twitter: @winbassett

The Community Roundup: May 14, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week!

—-

* The new issue of iO is out with two poems from friend Hannah Stephenson!

* Natalie Shapero has a poem in this week’s New Yorker.

* The new issue of AGNI is out!

* Congratulations to Rebecca Gayle Howell for her Pushcart Prize for “My Mother Told Us Not To Have Children” in Rattle.

* Cheers to Dwyer Murphy for being named a Center for Fiction 2014 Emerging Writer Fellow!

* Josh Robbins’s “Theodicy After Dickinson,” a poem from his new manuscript, is published in latest issue of Spiritus.

* C. Dale Young, Poetry Editor of New England Review, is the recipient of the 2014 Stanley W. Lindberg Award for Literary Editing.

* Tess Taylor interviewed at The Oxford American:

“Virginia Pars” is a poem about that, that feeling of coming from California and having the codes all wrong. I didn’t know what to wear or how to say “y’all.” There were also things you were and weren’t allowed to say, and I had this burning desire to know more about what slavery and civil rights meant for our family. But I got this feeling from them that it was impolite to talk about it. This feeling that I’d said a dirty word or something.

* Our buddy Terry Kennedy plans to speak at the 2014 Mississippi Writers Guild Conference in August.

* Ruth Graham wrote an essay for Poetry Foundation about Florence Ripley Mastin, an overlooked poet of the 20th century:

Mastin’s timing was lucky and unlucky. She was brash and butch and she loved women—one woman especially—but she died one year before the Stonewall riots. She was not a great poet, but she was lucky enough to be writing in a time where poetry was published in almost every daily newspaper, and commissioned for just about every public ceremony. Poetry, during her lifetime, was a viable, exciting, and culturally relevant pursuit; Mastin relished its sheen of elitism, but the truth is that she benefited from its mass appeal. She was able to publish prolifically as a high school teacher with modest talent and without many connections to the literary scene.

—-

Win Bassett‘s essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and  Guernica. His stories and poems have been published or are forthcoming in  PANK, Image, Ruminate, and  TropHe’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee. Follow him on Twitter: @winbassett

The Community Roundup: May 11, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week! [Another special Sunday edition!]

—-

* The new issue of Blackbird is out!

* The O. Henry Prize 2014 winners were announced.

* Nathaniel Mackey is awarded the 2014 Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize!

* BCP’s Rebecca Hazelton has three poems and Jamaal May has one poem in the new issue of Crazyhorse Literary Journal.

* Leesa Cross-Smith’s story “The Darl Inn” and an interview with her are in the Americana issue of Synaesthesia!

* BCP’s Rebecca Hazelton is the first poet out of the gate as Linebreak returns from its hiatus. She also has an essay at Poetry Foundation called “Teaching the Persona Poem,” and her book with BCP’s Brittany Cavallaro, No Girls No Telephones (Black Lawrence) is available for pre-order now!

* Nick Ripatrazone has the final essay in Image‘s 25th Anniversary issue.

—-

Win Bassett‘s essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and  Guernica. His stories and poems have been published or are forthcoming in  PANK, Image, Ruminate, and  TropHe’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee. Follow him on Twitter: @winbassett

The Community Roundup: May 4, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week! [Instead of our regularly scheduled Wednesday post, we present you with this special Sunday edition, due in large part to the end-of-semester crunch that many of our friends know well.]

—-

​* Erica Wright was the guest judge for Writers Digest‘s April poetry challenge!

* Lincoln Michel’s story collection, Upright Beasts, will be published by Coffee House Press.

* Loved this Q&A with Eryn Green, the 2013 Winner of Yale Series of Younger Poets:

I try to keep the process of writing a poem low-stakes as much as I can—I try to recognize my work within the broader scope of my life and the life of the universe, which sounds hokey, but is true. The stars and the sun make writing easier—if I don’t write a poem today, does anything suffer? No, assuredly not. The sky is still there, the ground is still there, the birds still know intuitively exactly when to strike up the band. Things remain well underway. So, writing for me is a way to recognize the larger conditions of things, and my place therein, and in this thinking writing a poem is inherently a moment of joy.

* Anna Clark interviewed about her forthcoming A Detroit Anthology:

A lot of people ended up writing about the experience of neighborhoods, whether it was growing up in them, or leaving them, or returning to them as grandparents … that sort of day-day life component was a big story that showed up in there. And there were other topics that I was sort of surprised that there weren’t more stories about, some of which I went out to solicit because I thought it was important to fill. Like sports — I was surprised there wasn’t more sports stories that came in the initial submission period. Same thing with art too — we really wanted some good photographs.

* Aaron Belz’s “My Chosen Vocation” from his new collection, Glitter Bomb (Persea), in Poetry Daily!

* Michael Robbins has two new poems up at the Los Angeles Review of Books for National Poetry Month!

* Alan Michael Parker wins Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition…again!

* Video of BCP’s Ross White and Rebecca Hazelton discussing the publishing process at the Couplet Poetry Festival at Old Books on Front St. in Wilmington, NC. Part 1 and Part 2.

May issue of Thrush Poetry Journal is live!

* Anthony Opal’s first book of poems, Action, will be released this fall. Here’s a video.

* Eliza Griswold writes about short-verse poems called landays in Outside magazine.

* GRIND’r Mary Lou Buschi has been busy: Her new chapbook is out with Dancing Girl Press, and all of in the included poems were written in the GRIND. The title poem, “Ukiyo-e” is in the current issue of Field. A GRIND poem also earned her a nomination for Best New Poets 2014 and Best of the Net 2014!

* Congrats to Helen Vitoria for her poetry collection, Corn Exchange, being awarded the 2014 IPPY (Independent Book Publisher Award) Silver Medal for Poetry!

* Friend Anna Sutton has a new poem, “Postpartum,” in superstition [review].

* Our friends at Poetry magazine won a National Magazine Award for “General Excellence: Literature, Science and Politics.” Congrats to Christian Wiman, Editor for February and September Print Editions and June Print and iPad Editions and Don Share, Editor for November and December iPad Editions! While you’re at it, check out Poetry‘s new May issue!

* GRIND’r Matthew Poindexter has a new article up at OZY: “Why Athlete Investors Strike Out in the Business World.”

* Ploughshares posts a good primer on flash fiction and namechecks BCP’s INCH!

—-

Win Bassett‘s essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and  Guernica. His stories and poems have been published or are forthcoming in  PANK, Image, Ruminate, and  TropHe’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee. Follow him on Twitter: @winbassett