Archive for April 2014

The Community Roundup: April 23, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week!

—-

* Jeremy Glazer reviews The Open Door: 100 Poems, 100 Years of Poetry Magazine, edited by Don Share and Christian Wiman, for the Los Angeles Review of Books.

* Nick Ripatrazone reviews Allison Seay’s debut collection To See the Queen in The Iowa Review.

* Wendy Xu interviewed by Cary Stough at The Missouri Review.

* Carolina Ebeid’s micro-essay went up last week at NPM DAILY.

* William Wright has published a wonderful story on his exterminator who knows Keats my heart:

Bobby went on surveying the shelves, mentioning his love of Theodore Roethke (“the early work—stuff like ‘Cuttings’”), William James, Wittgenstein, Heidegger, Shakespeare, and Hopkins. “I love that Hopkins fella. He sure as hell was ahead of his time, was he not? Died at 44, the poor bastard. Them sonnets are some of the best shit I read.” Then he recited half of “The Windhover,” began stumbling over the words, became immediately flustered, and shouted, “Fuck it! You know what I mean!”

​* Stefania Heim has joined Timothy Donnelly and BK Fischer as a poetry editor at the Boston Review​.

* Carmen Machado is killing it. Her recent things that’ve come out are this, from The New Yorker, and this, at Lightspeed. In May, she heads to the Millay Colony. In June, she’ll be at Sycamore Hill. In July, she’s teaching at the IYWS and the ISWF.

​* Rachel Mennies’s “Grandfather Onion” from The Glad Hand of God Points Backwards ran at Poetry Daily.​

​* Amanda Miska has a new story in the spring issue of Five [Quarterly].

* BCP’s Rebecca Hazelton has been loving Elisa Gabbert’s The Self Unstable: “What a book! Reading these prose poems feels like you’re playing an intellectual game of Two Truths and a Lie, only the categories keep changing on you. There’s humor and then there’s wicked humor, and Gabbert specializes in the latter.”

​* Nick McRae’s “Apple” featured on Sunday at Verse Daily! The poem is from Nick’s latest collection, Mountain Redemption (Black Lawrence Press).

* John Ebersole has 3 new poems at Canadian-based Zouch Magazine.

* Check out Thrush Poetry Journal‘s new anthology of the first two years–its first ever print publication!

* Leesa Cross-Smith’s story collection, Every Kiss a War (Mojave River Press) is out! Check out the book trailer.

* Aaron Belz is reading on Friday at Hullabaloo Books in Brooklyn to celebrate the release of his latest collection, Glitter Bomb (Persea).

* Loved the Asymptote interview with Katerina Stoykova-Klemer:

The process for translating was practically the same for each of the poets. By the time I finished reading the original poem, often I could already imagine the translation, and I would immediately write down the first draft.

* Leslie Jamison, Amy Woolard, and Julia Cooke reading in one room on April 30, thanks to VQR and A Public Space.

* GRIND’r Liz Gray, author of, The Green Sea of Heaven: Fifty Ghazals from the Diwan-i Hafiz-i Shirazi, will be reading at Brown University on Friday:

A night of music and poetry spanning from the 14th Century to the modern era, including readings from Hafez, Rumi, and Farrokhzad. Poems will be read in both Persian and English.

—-

Win Bassett‘s essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and  Guernica. His stories and poems have been published or are forthcoming in  PANK, Image, Ruminate, and  TropHe’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee. Follow him on Twitter: @winbassett

The Community Roundup: April 16, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week!

—-

Gabrielle Calvocoressi interviewed in HuffPo‘s 5 Questions for Poets: Part 2:

I’d like a few more ghosts. In terms of quality, may I switch the conversation to texture or scale and say I would like a vaster page, the quality of a building sized book so I could really see poems just open and open and risk getting lost and finding themselves in a new space. Really, I’d like that.

* Nick Ripatrazone has a poem in the new baseball anthology from Persea Books.

* Christopher Martin‘s second poetry chapbook, Everything Turns Away: Poems from Acworth and the Allatoonas, has been accepted for publication by La Vita Poetica Press and will be out in spring 2014.

* Congrats to friend Adrian Matejka for being awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship!

* Our friends at Jacar Press started a new online poetry magazine, One, and this first issue is stunning.

* Kevin Young interviewed at CityArts about Book of Hours:

Unfortunately I’d written about it before. This isn’t my first elegy, though I wish it were. But with this book I wanted to recount in everyday language those days and hours and months after my father died, to capture a daybook of grief. Some of it is in the details—little totems I would take from his house, or trying to get his dry cleaning. Those things became filled with meaning, and I was trying to go back to those things and to find the meaning about the aftermath. Ultimately, we all go through different moments of grief, and I hope in some way that writing about my grief will help others with theirs.

* Kima Jones on “Writers Of Color Flock To Social Media For A New Way To Use Language” for NPR:

Writers of color have and continue to write against the notion that their work will not be received unless a universally white audience receives it. Indeed, we write the books and submit to the journals and magazines, but writers of color have also found ways to use social media to create and sustain language and audience, to reinvigorate the genres of memoir, essay, fiction and poetry and connect with people who may not have found our work conventionally or otherwise.

* Michael Robbins writes “A poet’s guide to metal” for Harper’s.

* Erica Wright interviews Alex Lemon at Guernica:

And yes, poetry does need a bit of ferocity. Poetry needs to be alive, unabashedly, and, for me, that entails seeing its complexity—the grit and grimness and jubilance and beauty. The world comes to us (or maybe it’s just me—and I know someone said this, but I can’t for the life of me remember who it was) in fragments and shards. Whatever stories we shape from our days, we’re always dealing with gaps, blank-spots, and blackouts—and in handling all these breakages, we are, at all times, so incredibly intimate with sharp edges, the unending knife-like moments of failure and joy in our lives. The only way to attend to the fractured world (or the fractured world I live in) is to write a ferocious kind of music, to sing that volatility.

* GRIND’r Liz Gray, author of, The Green Sea of Heaven: Fifty Ghazals from the Diwan-i Hafiz-i Shirazi, will be reading at Brown University on April 25:

A night of music and poetry spanning from the 14th Century to the modern era, including readings from Hafez, Rumi, and Farrokhzad. Poems will be read in both Persian and English.

* Congratulations to Benjamin Miller for being named the first Tar Heel Poet Laureate!

* Mike Garrigan interviews BCP’s Ross White. They discuss hanging out at Governor’s School in North Carolina, the early 90’s, poetry forms, the GRIND, Ross’s poetry, the creative process, and the pros and cons of open mics. (note: Ross doesn’t like my praising his work here, but I’m going to do it anyway.)

* GRIND’r Rosalynde Vas Dias has a new poem in The Collagist. Friend Travis Smith also has new work in the issue!

* Digging Anna Claire Hodge‘s “Elegy with Shotgun” at Four Way Review.

Two poems from Luke Johnson in The Monarch Review.

* Fellow Durham resident and Editor/Poetry Editor of At Length Jonathan Farmer gives poet and UNC professor Alan Shapiro the long treatment today at Poetry Foundation:

In the summer of 1996, I was housesitting for Alan Shapiro. I was snooping, too, though I wouldn’t have admitted it. I was 22, and I wanted to see what it was like to be an adult. Even more, I wanted to see what it was like to be a poet. So when I sat down at his computer to do my own work, I found myself clicking on one of his Word files instead, telling myself as I did that I would close it right away.

Phrases scrambled down the screen like loose rocks on an incline, repeating, re-trying—exuberant: each downward leap a little different but still articulating the energy of the one before. It felt continuous and fast, as though the time of reading were the time of writing it. It felt joyous, too, in a way that the poems of his that I’d read before did not.

—-

Win Bassett‘s essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and  Guernica. His stories and poems have been published or are forthcoming in  PANK, Image, Ruminate, and  TropHe’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee. Follow him on Twitter: @winbassett

The Community Roundup: April 9, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week!

—-

Michael Nye, Managing Editor of The Missouri Reviewinterviewed:

What drives/motivates you?

The great American novelist Henry James has the answer to this one: “There are three things that are important in human life. The first is to be kind. The second is to be kind. The third is to be kind.”

* Nick Ripatrazone compiles a smart poetry playlist for The Millions with work from Erica Wright, Rebecca Gayle Howell, and Terry Kennedy:

Here is a poetry playlist: 10 poets offer their composition soundtracks. Enjoy their reflections on craft, and links to the poems and tunes that formed beautiful marriages of word and sound.

Interview with Don Share, Editor of Poetry magazine, at The Missouri Review.

Nick McRae has new poems at Connotation Press.

* Issue 12 of The Economy Magazine is now out from Anthony Opal and crew.

* Anthony Opal has two poems in the new Cream City Review. Here’s one: “Sonnet“.

Matthew Wimberley‘s “Elegy at Night” at the Paris-American featured in a post by NC Poet Laureate Joseph Bathanti, who looks like Chevy Chase.

Jennifer Habel featured on Brian Brodeur’s How a Poem Happens.

Justin Bigos‘s “Prayer After Refusing to Pray” in The New England Review featured here.

* Jamaal May‘s Hum featured in Gwarlingo‘s “The Sunday Poem.”

* Amanda Miska has a fantastic new story up at Storychord.

Waxwing editors interviewed by The Review Review.

* The new issue of Virginia Quarterly Review is out with work from friends Allison Wright, Leslie Jamison, Thomas Pierce, and Elliott Holt!

* The new issue of Town Creek Poetry is out with work from Christopher Martin.

* Rachel Mennies reviews Natalie Shapero‘s No Object for PANK:

The speakers of No Object confront death and grieving, and their consideration of this force and its reasons—death caused by nations or people, writ large or small—maintains one of the main tensions of the collection.

* Lisa Mecham has two new poems at Bodega and “a prose-poemy piece” at Cheap Pop. Both came out of GRIND!

* NPR‘s Code Switch has invited Kima Jones to curate a crowd-sourced poem on the subject of race and identity.

—-

Win Bassett‘s essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and  Guernica. His stories and poems have been published or are forthcoming in  PANK, Image, Ruminate, and  TropHe’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee. Follow him on Twitter: @winbassett

The Community Roundup: April 2, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week!

—-

* Issue No. 2 of Yale’s Letters journal dropped last week, and friends Christopher Martin and Michael Schmeltzer have new poems in it!

* A poem that Laura Van Prooyen wrote in last April’s GRIND appeared in the Missouri Review last week.

​* Hannah Dela Cruz Abrams interviewed at Speaking of Marvels.​

​* Baseball season begins this week, and Ashley Strosnider has a poem for opening day.​

​* New issue of The Collapsar! We especially love Amanda Miska‘s “Tell Me.”

* Rebecca Hazelton‘s piece for Poetry featured on Poetry Daily.

​* Two of Sarah Blake‘s poems will be in It Was Written: Poetry Inspired by Hip-Hop from Minor Arcana Press!

​* Nick Ripatrazone has a poem the latest issue of The Christian Century.

​* Mashable lists 38 Gifted Poets on Twitter. Friends Oliver de la Paz, Kima Jones, D.A. Powell, Don Share, Brian Spears, and Kevin Young make the list!

​* Congrats to Don Share for being awarded a 2014-2015 Harry Ransom Center Research Fellowship in the Humanities!

* April issue of Poetry has work from Gabrielle CalvocoressiMichael Klein, and Rebecca Hazelton!

* GRIND’r Kate Angus awarded Spring 2014 Orlando Creative Nonfiction Prize (she wrote/revised her essay during the GRIND of November 2013).

The Manifesto Project is open for manifesto and poetry submissions! This volume is forthcoming from Akron Poetry & Poetics. Rebecca Hazelton and Alan Michael Parker will be accepting submissions from April 1 to July 1, 2014.

* New issue of StorySouth up, and our friend John Ebersole has two poems in it.

Matthew Wimberley has two poems in the latest Nashville Review.

—-

Win Bassett‘s essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and  Guernica. His stories and poems have been published or are forthcoming in  PANK, Image, Ruminate, and  TropHe’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee. Follow him on Twitter: @winbassett