Archive for March 2014

The Community Roundup: March 26, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week!

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Leesa Cross-Smith wrote an excellent post on literary citizenship for the Renegade Writers’ Collective. And she gives BCP a shout-out!

* New issue of The Journal has work from Amy Woolard, Tarfia Faizullah, and Jamaal May.

* New issue of The Kenyon Review has fiction from Michael Nye.

* Two poems from Liz Gray‘s forthcoming From Never-Forsaken to Here are available online: “​Had She” at Poetry Daily and Kanpur Central Railway Station” at Beloit Poetry Journal.

​* Michael Robbins has a new poem in the Winter 2014 issue of The Los Angeles Review of Books Quarterly Journal.​

Luke Johnson‘s latest manuscript, Sanctuary, Sanctuary​, was a finalist for the Crab Orchard Open Competition.

​* “Greensboro has a history of generating literary giants. And it continues to be a city where poets and novelists thrive.”

* ​An interview with BCP’s Rebecca Hazelton about her chapbook Bad Star from YesYes Books at Speaking of Marvels!

​* Bull City Press’s Wilmington, NC,​ Couplet Poetry Festival readings on April 5 and April 6.​

* New Wag’s Revue!

* Corey Van Landingham has two poems in the Narrative​.

* Christopher Martin interviewed by Loose Change Magazine:

Some of the poems in this collection are straight from my yard. Marcescence consists of poems rooted in the topography, spiritual and physical, of Kennesaw Mountain, which is just south of where I live, between the towns of Marietta and Kennesaw. Kennesaw Mountain was the scene of the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain on June 27, 1864, as part of the Civil War’s Atlanta Campaign, and in addition to that, Kennesaw comes from Gahneesah, the Anglicized form of the Cherokee name for the mountain which means “burial ground” or “place of the dead.” It’s certainly a charged landscape, and the book taps into some of that.

* Congrats to Laura van den Berg, who will join the creative writing program at Colby College as a Faculty Fellow in Fiction for the 2014-2015 academic year.

* ​Rachel Mennies‘s new collection is out from Texas Tech University Press​: The Glad Hand of God Points Backwards.

Hannah Gamble has a new poem in Drunken Boat 17.

* Bull City Press and The Frost Place are pleased to announce that the winner of the 2014 Frost Place Chapbook Contest Sponsored by BCP is The Greenhouse by Lisa Gluskin Stonestreet of Oakland, California. In addition to The Greenhouse, the editors at BCP have selected Beneath the Ice Fish Like Souls Look Alike by Emilia Phillips of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, for publication.

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Win Bassett‘s essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and Guernica. His stories and poems have been published or are forthcoming in PANK, Image, Ruminate, and TropHe’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee. Follow him on Twitter: @winbassett

2014 Frost Place Chapbook Competition Winner: Lisa Gluskin Stonestreet

Bull City Press and The Frost Place are pleased to announce that the winner of the 2014 Frost Place Chapbook Contest Sponsored by Bull City Press is The Greenhouse by Lisa Gluskin Stonestreet of Oakland, California.  In addition to The Greenhouse, the editors at Bull City Press have selected Beneath the Ice Fish Like Souls Look Alike by Emilia Phillips of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, for publication.

The final judge for this year, David Baker, said of The Greenhouse:

Lisa Gluskin Stonestreet’s collection, The Greenhouse, asserted itself from the first reading for its interplay of restlessness and patience, its mapping of an interiority both shared and dearly personal, and for its lyric and maternal primacy.  Primacy is the circumstance, yet doubleness is the story of The Greenhouse, a double birth.  The triggering narrative of these fabulous poems traces the coming-into-life first months of Stonestreet’s infant son and the elemental onset of “memory without language . . . / no name, no category.  Milk. // The present nudging at the shore.”  But an ever more engaging, intense tale follows a second birth:  the coming-back-to-words of Stonestreet herself, at once “tethered to the tug on the other end” while also struggling to remember and reclaim—even reinvent—her autonomous self:  “a good test-taker.  Conversationalist. / Raised to please. Born to run.”  At first tentative, hesitant, even self-doubting (“almost guaranteed you will find / it boring / (domestic) (female) (too much) (too little, too small)”), the voice tutors itself in how to return to the social world where she was once so proficient and adept.  It’s the very nature and identity of the self that has changed in the process of mothering—a process so primal and singular, yet so equally mundane (“Millions / of babies, of mothers, millions more jars // flowing from the conveyor belt”).  Throughout this brilliant collection, Stonestreet’s curiosities and honesties are bracing and true, as she chides and nurtures, studies and entreats, meditates, amuses, and sings, even if it’s just “one song when all the rest have fled from memory.”  The poems of The Greenhouse are profound, fundamental works, born of a deep interiority and making their intricate ways, phrase by phrase, toward a design both organic and artful.

Lisa Gluskin Stonestreet

Lisa Gluskin Stonestreet’s Tulips, Water, Ash was selected for the Morse Poetry Prize and published by University Press of New England. Her poems have been awarded a Javits fellowship and a Phelan Award, and have appeared in journals including Cream City Review, At Length, Quarterly West, Blackbird, The Iowa Review, 32 Poems, and Third Coast and in the anthologies Best New Poets and The Bloomsbury Anthology of Contemporary Jewish American Poetry. She writes, edits, and teaches in Oakland, California.

The Greenhouse will be published in August, 2014.  Stonestreet will attend the 2014 Frost Place Poetry Seminar, directed by Patrick Donnelly, as the second Frost Place Chapbook Fellow.  She will have the opportunity to reside in the Frost Place Museum, a“house museum” and sanctuary for lovers of poetry and books on a quiet north country lane with a spectacular view of the White Mountains, for one week in September, 2014. The house, built in the 1860s, is miraculously well-preserved thanks to the care of the families that lived there until the mid-1970s, and is now owned by the citizens of Franconia, New Hampshire, who voted at their town meeting in 1976 to purchase the former home of Robert Frost and his family in order to see to its safekeeping in perpetuity.

The following manuscripts were finalists in this year’s competition:

  • No Freedom, by Dan Albergotti of Conway, South Carolina
  • Passenger, by Jeremy Bass of Brooklyn, New York
  • El Camino and Other Poems, by Mark Jay Brewin, Jr. of Burlington, North Carolina
  • The Vishnu Bird, by Kathryn Stripling Byer of Cullowhee, North Carolina
  • Every Last Thing, by Matt Donovan of Sante Fe, New Mexico
  • History, by Elizabeth T. Gray, Jr. of New York, New York
  • No Lore, No Mutiny, by Autumn McClintock of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • And the Stars from the Sky Are Ripped, by Winnona Elson Pasquini of Tampa, Florida
  • Like Shining from Shook Foil, by Christian Teresi of Arlington, Virginia
  • From Bone, by Anna Welch of Erie, Pennsylvania
  • Elsa, by Angela Veronica Wong of Buffalo, New York

This year’s contest featured a significant number of worthy manuscripts.  Bull City Press and the Frost Place thank all of the authors who submitted their work for consideration. The submission period for the 2015 Frost Place Chapbook Contest Sponsored by Bull City Press will be Oct. 1, 2014 – Dec. 31, 2014.

The Community Roundup: March 19, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week!

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* Two Sandra Beasley food poems at Southern Foodways Alliance’s Gravy.

* Rose Post Creative Nonfiction Competition Winners Announced, and the judge was Hannah Dela Cruz Abrams!

Emilia Phillips interviews BCP’s Rebecca Hazelton:

It’s difficult for me as well. If I worried about what people would think reading my poems, if people would like them or not, or whether I’ll be judged based off their content, I’d start censoring myself, which leads to evasive poems. It feels disingenuous when an author waves a bit of lovely imagery or language play or research our way in hopes we won’t see what they can’t look at themselves. Poems like that leave me cold.

Aaron Burch on how he taught his first poetry class:

As we approached our move into workshop, after a couple weeks of reading and discussing poetry and doing various exercises, in and outside of class, I asked some poet friends if they might not be willing to send me both a rough and final draft of a poem to share with my students. Matthew Olzmann was kind enough to send me, in essence, five poems: three rough draft, two final.

* Our buddy and INCH co-founder Bill Ferris helps you deal with rejection at Writer Unboxed.

* New issues of The Collagist and Boxcar Poetry Review are out!

* The American South issue of Guernica has dropped, and it’s loaded! Megan Mayhew Bergman, Jamie Quatro, Laura van den Berg, Rebecca Gayle Howell, Ann Neumann, David Bottoms, Bill Cheng, Ed Winstead, Lincoln Michel, Clay Matthews, Lauren Holmes, and more!

* Clay Matthews wins 2nd place in Baltimore Review contest with “An Angel Gets Her Wings“.

P.J. Williams and Jason McCall will publish It Was Written: Poetry Inspired by Hip-Hop with Minor Arcana Press in 2015.

* Leslie Shipman was in last weekend’s Kenyon Review Weekend Reads.

* For two weeks, Sundog Lit will publish work by amazing women inspired by Leesa Cross-Smith‘s new book, Every Kiss a War.

* New Matthew Wimberley poem in Narrative: “Words for My Father from Salmon, Idaho“.

New Orleans Review has posted four poems from Liz Gray‘s forthcoming book, From Never-Forsaken Here.

Three new poems from William Wright at Terrian.org.

* One of our favorite presses, YesYes Books, will release GRIND participant Aricka Foreman‘s chapbook, Dream with an Empty Chamber.

* Congratulations to Will Guzzardi, founder of Wag’s Revue, who just won the Democratic primary for Illinois’ 39th District house seat. At age 26.

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Win Bassett‘s essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and Guernica. His stories and poems have been published or are forthcoming in PANK, Image, Ruminate, and TropHe’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee. Follow him on Twitter: @winbassett

The Community Roundup: March 12, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week!

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​* Danniel Schoonebeek‘s first book of poems, American Barricade, is out now from YesYes Books, and it’s available for pre-order here. His poem “C’est La Guerre” was the poem of the day last week at the Academy of American Poets.

* Bask in the glory of Leesa Cross Smith with this long interview of her at That Lit Site. Next week, Sundog Lit launches an all-lady barrage of pieces in support of Leesa’s Every Kiss A War.

* Our friends at Flyleaf Books in Chapel Hill have a great lineup this month: Emilia Phillips and Nick McRae tomorrow; Rochelle Hurt on March 18.

* Our neighbor Aaron Belz profiled in Indy Week:

Aaron Belz does not add up. Everything about him misleads. Start with his poetry. John Ashbery praised his second book, Lovely, Raspberry, as “bright, friendly, surprising.” Influential poetry critic Marjorie Perloff hails Glitter Bomb, due out in June from Persea Press, as “irreverent, devastating, even nasty at times.”

Hum by Jamaal May is a 2014 Notable Books List winner! Also, congrats to Jamaal  and Melinda Moustakis for being the new The Kenyon Review fellows!

Christopher Martin‘s third poetry chapbook, Marcescence: Poems from Gahneesah, has been accepted for publication by Finishing Line Press. This collection is co-authored by David King and consists of poems rooted in the topography and history of Kennesaw Mountain. This collection will be following closely behind Chris’s second chapbook, Everything Turns Away, which will be out with La Vita Poetica Press in a couple months. Chris also has a new poem, “Sabbath of the Sulphurs,” in the current grace-themed issue of Pilgrimage.

INCH contributor Michelle Peñaloza has two poems at Hobart and two poems at Hyphen.

* William Wright announces that an anthology he’s co-editing with Daniel Cross Turner has been officially accepted by the University of South Carolina Press!

* GRIND’er Travis Smith is the featured poet for March 2014 at Anti-.

John Ebersole interviews Mary Ruefle at New Books Poetry.

Congratulations to INCH contributor Nickolas Butler, featured in The New York Times!

* See Luke Johnson and Will Schutt read from their poems on Thursday night in Roanoke, Va. Will also received the Jeannette Haien Ballard Prize, “a $25,000 annual prize given to a young writer of proven excellence in poetry or prose. Established to honor author Jeannette Haien’s interest in the work of talented young writers and her desire to benefit and further their careers by encouraging the production of literary works of high quality and aesthetic worth.”

Justin Brouckaert, James Dickey Fellow in Fiction at the University of South Carolina, has a stunning nonfiction piece at The Rumpus this week: “Like Tiny Little Cracks.”

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Win Bassett‘s essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and Guernica. His stories and poems have been published or are forthcoming in PANK, Image, Ruminate, and TropHe’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee. Follow him on Twitter: @winbassett

The Community Roundup: March 5, 2014

by Win Bassett

In an effort to be a charitable citizen of the independent publishing community, we’d like to give a little love to our contributors, friends, and fellow members each week!

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​* Exciting news forthcoming about an anthology from University of Akron Press, co-edited by BCP’s Rebecca Hazelton and Alan Michael Parker. “More soon,” Rebecca says!

* After 5 years of planning, Rebecca Rubenstein‘s literary magazine, Midnight Breakfast, is now a real thing!

* Thrilled to see so many friends getting teaching jobs. Congrats to Tess Taylor for accepting a position as Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Whittier College!

Flavorwire says Melissa Broder “Is Twitter’s Most Fascinating Poet“:

she represents a different method for writers to introduce potential readers to their work through social media. Broder’s weird and darkly whimsical tweets take tidbits from popular culture and chop and screw them down to 140 characters. Like many of us, Broder seems to tweet whatever pops into her head at that very second; unlike many of us, most of what she tweets is brilliant.

​* Matthew Olzmann has two new poems in Lantern Review. He also has three new poems—”Possum Drop,” “The Discipline Monkey”, and “A Calm Eerie War could mean We are a Miracle”—in the Poetry Congeries section of Connotation-Press An Online-Artifact.

​* New P.J. Williams work in Ostrich Review.

Rattle No. 43: Love Poems is out!

​* BCP’s INCH featured in the The Chronicle​’s “The people’s publishers​.”​

* March issue of Poetry is here!

​* Ansel Elkins has been​ selected as winner of the 2014 Yale Series of Younger Poets. Her manuscript Blue Yodel, selected by Carl Phillips, will be published by Yale University Press in April 2015. ​See her poem “Blues for the Death of the Sun” in Guernica.​

​* Congrats to ​Helen Vitoria! Her book Corn Exchange has been named a Finalist for the 2014 Eric Hoffer da Vinci Eye Award & the 2014 Eric Hoffer Montaigne Medal!

PANK magazine online, issue 9.3, March 2014, now up!

The New York Times profiles Black Ocean.

Another & Another contributor Travis Smith reads in Boston next Monday at 7:00 p.m.

Kevin Young in The New York Times MagazineA Poet’s Ode to His Late Father:

The collection is Young’s most personal — and yet universal — to date. To read the poems in order is to be taken through every stage of loss. He writes in the poem “Wintering” that “Mourning, I’ve learned, is just a moment, many, / grief the long betrothal beyond.” There is the drafting of the eulogy, the donating of organs, the seemingly mundane act of picking up the deceased’s unclaimed dry cleaning, the ordering of the tombstone. There is the forgiving, the letting go and then there is the transition from filial to paternal obligation as death gives way to birth and Young becomes a parent himself. Above all, “Book of Hours” is a handbook for those who, left behind by the dead, still live.

*  2015 Fence Modern Poets Series Prize is Solar, by Kevin Holden. Solar was selected by Katy Lederer, Fence editor emeritus.

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Win Bassett‘s essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and Guernica. His stories and poems have been published or are forthcoming in PANK, Image, Ruminate, and TropHe’s a former assistant district attorney and serves on the PEN Prison Writing Program Fiction Committee. Follow him on Twitter: @winbassett

Emerging Writers We’ve Discovered This Week: March 4, 2014

We adore our INCH contributors and book authors, and we always have our eyes and ears open for emerging writers when we scan the latest issues of journals, check the most recent blog posts, catch the tweets flying by, or grab a beer at a local reading.

We’d like to celebrate some of the new and not-so-new artists we discover during the course of our weeks in the hopes that they’ll contribute to Bull City Press in the future. (And we want to celebrate the hell out of our indie press community that we love.)

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Late night. A hotel bar after a writers’ conference. Writers at every table, lining the walls and the windows, crushed together at the bar. Everybody working some angle, talking readings or hookups or where to eat. A couple books change hands, move from one messenger bag to another. But in the boozy post-conference tumult, you see only one writer actually reading, oblivious to everything around him. Absolutely engulfed, the way every reader wants to be in a book. I ask what the book is. I have to know. He hands me David Tomas Martinez‘s Hustle, forthcoming in May from Sarabande Books. A tempestuous voice, aware of the brutality its masculinity sometimes suggests, carefully controlled with dextrous syntax. I’m transported. Fifteen pages later, someone taps me on the shoulder and asks what has me so beguiled.

Now May can’t arrive quickly enough. “Coveralls” and video readings of “Calaveras” and “Innominatus” will tide me over.
— Ross White

I’m in the thick of studying the Pauline letters, and when I discovered yesterday that Tania Runyan not only wrote a poem narrated by Onesimus (of Philemon fame in the New Testament) but has an entire collection (Second Sky (Wipf and Stock Publishers)) that “grapples with Paul and his letters through the movement of geographical and spiritual travel,” I breathed a “Alleluia” and bought her book. How did I come across Tania? She’s Image‘s Artist of the Month.
Win Bassett